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Institute for Integrated Catalysis

The Institute for Integrated Catalysis at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory facilitates collaborative research and development in catalysts for a secure energy future.

  • John Peters

    John Peters Selected as AAAS Fellow

    Congratulations to Dr. John Peters on being elected an American Association of the Advancement of Science Fellow. Peters is a joint appointed laboratory fellow at DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and director and professor at Washington State University's Institute of Biological Chemistry.

  • Image created using soft ion landing

    Scientific Art Garners Top Honors in 2017 Contest

    Researchers use soft ion landing deposition and a helium ion microscope to produce winning entries in PNNL's 2017 Science as Art Competition.

  • Molecule heterolytic cleavage.

    A Molecule Made to be Broken

    In the continual search for clean fuel production, scientists have been investigating ways to build and cleave hydrogen molecules. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory achieved control over the rate of cleavage and reassembly by designing a catalyst with the perfect balance of properties.

  • Reaction path

    The Pivotal Step in Turning Carbon Dioxide

    What if we could turn carbon dioxide into a feedstock to create fuels or other chemicals? The challenge is designing effective processes that yield only the desired chemical. Scientists need a clear understanding of the pivotal steps. Now, scientists at DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have learned a key step involving formate.

  • Chart showing reaction path and energy needs

    Meeting the Need for Catalytic Speed

    The rates to convert agricultural and other organic waste into biofuels at low temperatures are currently too low to be economically competitive. Scientists at DOE's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and TU München in Germany developed ways to accelerate the reaction rates. The solution was forcing a key reaction to occur in the nano-sized confining pores inside zeolites.

The Institute for Integrated Catalysis explores and develops the chemistry and technology of catalyzed processes that enable a carbon-neutral future.

Catalysis is key to sustainable development that secures energy independence, and it is critical to the transition from the current use of carbon resources for energy and chemicals towards solely using recycled and renewable carbon as well as renewable energy resources. Currently, 80 percent of all chemical products and energy carriers are made using catalysts in at least one of the processing steps, producing an economic impact estimated to be over $10 trillion per year worldwide. The long-term transition to a sustainable economy requires not only reinventing the large processes of today, but also enabling the harvest and use of dispersed renewable carbon and energy resources. These challenges define the mission of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis (IIC):

  • Provide the insight, the synthetic tools, and the engineering concepts to enable catalyzed chemical and chemical-electrical energy interconversions to minimize the carbon footprint of the global energy system.
  • Develop experimental and theoretical tools to better understand the structure and properties of working catalysts to be used as guidelines for novel catalyst generations and novel reaction routes.
  • Translate the fundamental insight into novel and improved catalytic technology.
IIC contributors

The IIC integrates more than 120 scientists and engineers from different organizations at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These organizations include the Physical and Computational Science Directorate (PCSD), the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the Energy and Environment Directorate (EED) and encompass a wide range of catalysis disciplines. The cross-disciplinary collaboration and mutual influence produces a unique creative environment, which is a prerequisite for transformative research. The key scientific challenges addressed within the IIC focus on adding hydrogen to oxo-functionalized carbon resources (such as biomass constituents or carbon dioxide), storing electric energy in hydrogen, oxygen, or nitrogen (key focuses of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center), manipulating carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds, and exhaust catalysis.

Institute for Integrated Catalysis

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